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Model for a Pedagogical Vehicle

2018
Painted iron, castors, fabric, inkjet prints mounted on PVC, paper objects
300 x 350 x 465 cm
bauhaus imaginista: Corresponding With
Curated by Marion von Osten and Grant Watson
The National Museum of Modern Art Kyoto
Photo: Yuki Moriya

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  Design for pillows , 2017    Model for a Pedagogical Vehicle  refers to the historical  Seikatsu Kōsei Tenrankai  in Tokyo, established by Renshichirō Kawakita in 1931.  Seikatsu Kōsei  was an exhibition that aimed to introduce Bauhaus ideas and pedagogy to a Japanese audience, by combining the design principles and preliminary course practices of the Bauhaus with material from the Japanese modernist movement and local crafts.  The self-bearing structure,  Model for a Pedagogical Vehicle , is both visual and tactile, and approachable on different levels. It contains documentation of the 1931 exhibition and includes reconstructions of paper studies that featured in the show, which have been made by Eric Gjerde. Completing the setting are three-dimensional textile elements arranged on the floor, inspired by diagrams that were displayed on the ceiling in the historic  Seikatsu Kōsei  exhibition.  The display structure refers in part to the set designs of Jikken Kōbō (1951–57), a group of visual artists, musical composers, photographers, and engineers who are emblematic of the reception of the Bauhaus in postwar Japan. In this sense, the installation as a whole can be seen as an attempt to reconnect the distinct approaches to, and influences from, the Bauhausian pedagogy and philosophy prevalent before and after the Second World War.

Design for pillows, 2017


Model for a Pedagogical Vehicle refers to the historical Seikatsu Kōsei Tenrankai in Tokyo, established by Renshichirō Kawakita in 1931. Seikatsu Kōsei was an exhibition that aimed to introduce Bauhaus ideas and pedagogy to a Japanese audience, by combining the design principles and preliminary course practices of the Bauhaus with material from the Japanese modernist movement and local crafts.

The self-bearing structure, Model for a Pedagogical Vehicle, is both visual and tactile, and approachable on different levels. It contains documentation of the 1931 exhibition and includes reconstructions of paper studies that featured in the show, which have been made by Eric Gjerde. Completing the setting are three-dimensional textile elements arranged on the floor, inspired by diagrams that were displayed on the ceiling in the historic Seikatsu Kōsei exhibition.

The display structure refers in part to the set designs of Jikken Kōbō (1951–57), a group of visual artists, musical composers, photographers, and engineers who are emblematic of the reception of the Bauhaus in postwar Japan. In this sense, the installation as a whole can be seen as an attempt to reconnect the distinct approaches to, and influences from, the Bauhausian pedagogy and philosophy prevalent before and after the Second World War.